My Third Novel's Conclusion, My Heartbreak

My heart begins to break when I think about completing this particular book -- because this narrative has sustained me like no other story I've known. It's both more personal and more universal than my other works. But beyond memory and archetype, it's a cri-de-coeur about needing to become the person one is destined to be. And in the writing, I have met my own life's work, my own fated journey -- having the sense all the while that the pages are suffused with a resonance, an energy, an electrified field that defies explanation. Writers hope and pray to be overtaken by a work in this way -- to be conscripted into passionate service of a profound story. To experience it even once in a lifetime seems a great privilege. I still have perhaps six months before this novel is complete, and this constitutes my reprieve. Because I'm not ready for the beauty to end.

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Alone Together

My afternoon coffee shop jaunts give me a rather blissful escape into the alone-together sphere.  I read -- I write -- I run into friends and acquaintances -- I chat with strangers.  Art and life mix together in some seamless, aesthetic way in which writers do not need to absent themselves from the fascinating dialog of life.  I arrive at Hanahaus just when the lunch rush is departing -- and then settle myself for a couple of hours with tea and snacks and books and people.  Almost always, an intriguing conversation -- an unexpected introduction -- a fortuitous visit spring into being.  I've met painters, entrepreneurs, musicians -- I've run into a poet friend I haven't seen in years, and a documentary filmmaker friend of whom I had regretfully lost track.  I leave having steeped myself in the adventure of being alone together, a writer surrounded by people, an artist immersed in the bountiful world.

And all the while, my relationship to the page grows yet more intense.  I'm connected to it by a kind of electric charge -- an elemental force.  The words insist on themselves, passionately, indelibly -- and I bid them to come and meet me.  In mysterious answer, they do.

10 comments:

  1. I love hearing about your creative process and how you go about your work!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Don't you find that sometimes you need to be completely alone while you're writing?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sometimes, yes. But I love to work in the public realm, too. I like the mixing of private/public space somehow. I accomplish a great deal and I always end up having fascinating conversations with people as well.

      Delete
  3. Coffee shops and writers have quite a history together, don't they?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, F. Scott Fitzgerald, T.S. Eliot all loved coffee shops -- Shakespeare liked to write in pubs, I think, because the candles were paid for by the establishment!

      Delete
  4. I'm determined to run into you in that coffee shop one afternoon. I live in Palo Alto.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Every time you mention electricity, I think of the novel "The Power." Have you read this yet?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm reading it right now -- terrific book!

      Delete